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Lewisville calendar of events: June 19-24

June 19

10:30 a.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Preschool time

The library will host free early literacy classes for preschoolers ages 3 to 6 years old. Classes will be held at 10:30 a.m. Mondays and at 11:15 a.m. Tuesdays. Activities will include stories, songs, finger plays and movement. The theme for the day is reinforced through a take-home activity. A ticket is required. Space is limited, so plan to arrive early. Tickets are available on a first-come, first-serve basis at the youth services desk, 30 minutes before the start of the class.

11:15 a.m. to noon

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Mother Goose time

The library will host free early literacy classes for infants up to 15 months old. Classes will be held at 11:15 a.m. Mondays, 1:30 p.m. Wednesdays and 11:15 a.m. Thursdays. The lap-sit class is designed to encourage one-on-one interaction between adult and child. A ticket is required. Space is limited, so plan to arrive early. Tickets are available on a first-come, first-serve basis at the youth services desk, 30 minutes before the start of the class. There will also be a 20 minute free play at the end of each Mother Goose Time.

6:30 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W Main St.

Monday madness

For children entering grades kindergarten through fifth grade. Free weekly events feature different performers. No registration is required.

June 19 – Juggler David Slick

June 26 – Ballet Folklorico

July 3 – Fossil Rim presents The Lorax

July 10 – Sci-Tech Discovery Center

July 17 – Brett Roberts Bubble Show

July 24 – Critterman

7 p.m.

Lewisville City Hall, 151 W. Church St.

City council meeting

The Lewisville City Council will have a special workshop meeting on Monday.

June 20

10:30 to 11:15 a.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Toddler time

The library will host free early literacy classes for toddlers ages 15 to 36 months at 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays, at 10:30 and 11:15 a.m. Wednesdays and at 10:30 a.m. Thursdays. Classes are designed for walkers, each weekly theme is reinforced through an age-appropriate take-home activity. A ticket is required. Space is limited, so plan to arrive early. Tickets are available on a first-come, first-serve basis at the youth services desk, 30 minutes before the start of the class.

10:30 to 1 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

ESL classes for adults

Free English as a Second Language classes for adults are now being offered at the Lewisville Public Library Tuesdays and Thursdays. The classes are provided by Denton ISD Adult Education and Literacy and funded by the Texas Workforce Commission. Registration is required. Call Denton ISD at 972-350-3481.

2 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Mystery book club

The Booked for Murder Mystery Book Club will meet to discuss “The Kind Worth Killing” by Peter Swanson. The club meets the third Tuesday of the month.

4 to 8 p.m.

Lewisville City Hall, 151 W. Church St.

Lewisville Farmers Market

The city of Lewisville is partnering with Four Seasons Markets to bring the Lewisville Farmers Market to Old Town. The venture will begin Thursday, April 27 and continue every Thursday from 3-7 p.m. in the east parking lot of City Hall through November.

For information visit fourseasonsmarkets.com.

4:30 to 5:30 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Robotics camp

Sign up for one of the four-week robotics camps and discover how to build a working robot from beginning to end. Each lesson builds on the previous class, so participants must register for all four courses. Children may only sign up for one four-week session. Registration opens two weeks before each session begins. To register call 972-219-3577 or visit the youth services desk. The first session is June 20 and 27. It is open to children ages 9 to 12 years old.

7 to 8:30 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Irish Gaelic lessons

The DFW Gaelic League provides free classes for anyone interested in learning Irish Gaelic. The group meets every Tuesday in the small conference room. Beginners of any skill level are welcome. The program is for teenagers at least 15 years old and adults.

7 to 9 p.m.

Wayne Ferguson Plaza, 150 W. Church St.

Sounds of Lewisville concert

Satisfaction: The International Rolling Stones Show will play the 2017 Sounds of Lewisville Concert Series.

The popular Sounds of Lewisville concert series, a free family favorite since 1991, returns with a series of eight shows this summer in Wayne Ferguson Plaza in the heart of historic Old Town Lewisville. Concerts take place every Tuesday night in June and July. Attendees are encouraged to bring blankets and lawn chairs for their comfort. Outside food and drink are allowed, and food trucks will also be onsite. Well-behaved pets on a leash are allowed at all shows.

For information call 972-219-3401.

June 21

3 to 4 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Gardening with Grandkids Part II

Grandparents and caregivers will learn how to engage their grandchildren in the gardening growing process. No registration required.

6 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Interactive movie night

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

For teens entering grades six through 12. Teens may have seen the movie “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” before, but never quite like this – with props and prompts to let interact with the story along with the rest of the audience. All supplies will be provided. Costumes, wands and wizarding attire encouraged. Registration is required. Visit the youth services desk or call 972-219-3577 to sign up.

7 to 8 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Library board meeting

The Lewisville Public Library Board meets the third Wednesday of each month.

June 22

11:15 a.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Bilingual preschool time

The library is introducing a new line of Spanish programming. The bilingual preschool story time includes reading, writing, singing, talking, playing and more for children ages 3-6 and their families. A free ticket is required for entry, and tickets are handed out 30 minutes before class starts on a first-come first-served basis.

4 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Summer fun club

Librarians will host a different activity each week for children entering first through third grades. Activities could include games, crafts or experiments. Tickets are available on a first-come, first-served basis at the Youth Services Desk, 30 minutes prior to the program start time.

6:30 to 8 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W Main St.

Crochet corner

Join experienced crocheter Michele Harlass and learn how to make basic crochet stitches and apply stitches to make different projects. Come together to share ideas, get inspiration or show off work. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own yarn and needles. A limited amount of supplies will be provided. No registration is required. Open to adults.

7 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Totally teen Thursdays

For teens entering grades six through 12. Each week is a different activity.

June 22 – Make Some Art

June 29 – Teen Trivia

July 6 – Game Night

July 13 – Craft Attack

July 20 – Teen Advisory Group

July 27 – Rock-Paper-Scissors Tournament

Registration is required. Visit the youth services desk or call 972-219-3577 to sign up.

June 23

2 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Friday family matinee

Bring the whole family and enjoy a child-friendly film at the library. No registration required.

June 23 – The Jungle Book

June 30 – Sing

July 7- Pete’s Dragon

July 14 – Storks

July 21 – The BFG

July 28 – Finding Dory

7 p.m.

MCL Grand, 100 N. Charles St.

Acoustic jam session

The Visual Art League of Lewisville hosts free weekly acoustic jam sessions every Friday. All acoustic instruments and levels are welcome. All music genres are welcome.

For information visit visualartleague.org.

June 24

11:15 a.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Family story time

A story time for all ages to share stories, songs, finger plays and movement reinforcing early literacy skills. Ticket is required. Space is limited, so plan to arrive early. Tickets are available on a first-come, first-serve basis at the youth services desk, 30 minutes before the start of the class.

3 to 4 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Decluttering 101

Decluttering can change lives for the better. Professional organizer Sandra Luna of Space Matters will teach attendees how to bring order into homes.

Source Article

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Lewisville calendar of events: June 11-17

June 11

8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

LLELA, 201 E. Jones St.

Summer camp

LLELA summer camps are for children entering second through seventh grade. There are two simultaneous camps per week for grades second through fourth and fifth through seventh.

All day

Lewisville Lake Park, 600 Sandy Beach Road

Pro Watercross National Tour

Lewisville will host the Pro Watercross Tour National Tour on Lewisville Lake June 10-11. The annual tour visits lakes and beaches across the country each summer. It is the featured national tour for personal watercraft racing, combining the finest professional and amateur athletes in the United States and internationally for extreme racing on challenging closed courses. Tour events draw thousands of spectators on site, plus millions more for television and online video broadcasts.

For information on the Pro Watercross Tour visit prowatercross.com. Lewisville-area lodging, dining and entertainment information is available at visitLewisville.com.

2 to 3 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Book club

The Sunday Readers Book Club will discuss “A Gentleman in Moscow” by Amor Towles.

June 12

10:30 a.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Preschool time

The library will host free early literacy classes for preschoolers ages 3 to 6 years old. Classes will be held at 10:30 a.m. Mondays and at 11:15 a.m. Tuesdays. Activities will include stories, songs, finger plays and movement. The theme for the day is reinforced through a take-home activity. A ticket is required. Space is limited, so plan to arrive early. Tickets are available on a first-come, first-serve basis at the youth services desk, 30 minutes before the start of the class.

11:15 a.m. to noon

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Mother Goose time

The library will host free early literacy classes for infants up to 15 months old. Classes will be held at 11:15 a.m. Mondays, 1:30 p.m. Wednesdays and 11:15 a.m. Thursdays. The lap-sit class is designed to encourage one-on-one interaction between adult and child. A ticket is required. Space is limited, so plan to arrive early. Tickets are available on a first-come, first-serve basis at the youth services desk, 30 minutes before the start of the class. There will also be a 20-minute free play at the end of each Mother Goose Time.

3 to 4 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Gardening with Grandkids part I

Grandparents and caregivers will learn how to engage their grandchildren in the gardening growing process. No registration required for Part I. This first part is designed for grandparents and caregivers. Attendees at Part I be allowed priority registration for Part II.

6:30 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W Main St.

Monday madness

For children entering grades kindergarten through fifth grade. Free weekly events feature different performers. No registration is required.

June 12 – Whirled on a String

June 19 – Juggler David Slick

June 26 – Ballet Folklorico

July 3 – Fossil Rim presents The Lorax

July 10 – Sci-Tech Discovery Center

July 17 – Brett Roberts Bubble Show

July 24 – Critterman

June 13

10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MCL Grand, 100 N. Charles St.

Urban Texas exhibit

The Visual Art League of Lewisville exhibit “Urban Texas” exhibit will be on display through June 17 in the main art gallery.

The exhibit is the annual juried show by Visual Art League of Lewisville members. The exhibit will include pieces with a Texas theme.

Admission is free and the gallery is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, and during public performances at MCL Grand.

10:30 to 11:15 a.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Toddler time

The library will host free early literacy classes for toddlers ages 15 to 36 months at 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays, at 10:30 and 11:15 a.m. Wednesdays and at 10:30 a.m. Thursdays. Classes are designed for walkers, each weekly theme is reinforced through an age-appropriate take-home activity. A ticket is required. Space is limited, so plan to arrive early. Tickets are available on a first-come, first-serve basis at the youth services desk, 30 minutes before the start of the class.

10:30 to 1 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

ESL classes for adults

Free English as a Second Language classes for adults are now being offered at the Lewisville Public Library Tuesdays and Thursdays. The classes are provided by Denton ISD Adult Education and Literacy and funded by the Texas Workforce Commission. Registration is required. Call Denton ISD at 972-350-3481.

4 to 8 p.m.

Lewisville City Hall, 151 W. Church St.

Lewisville Farmers Market

The city of Lewisville is partnering with Four Seasons Markets to bring the Lewisville Farmers Market to Old Town. The venture will begin Thursday, April 27 and continue every Thursday from 3-7 p.m. in the east parking lot of City Hall through November.

For information visit fourseasonsmarkets.com.

4:30 to 5:30 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Robotics camp

Sign up for one of the four-week robotics camps and discover how to build a working robot from beginning to end. Each lesson builds on the previous class, so participants must register for all four courses. Children may only sign up for one four-week session. Registration opens two weeks before each session begins. To register call 972-219-3577 or visit the youth services desk. The first session is June 13, 20 and 27. It is open to children ages 9 to 12 years old.

7 to 8:30 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Irish Gaelic lessons

The DFW Gaelic League provides free classes for anyone interested in learning Irish Gaelic. The group meets every Tuesday in the small conference room. Beginners of any skill level are welcome. The program is for teenagers at least 15 years old and adults.

7 to 9 p.m.

Wayne Ferguson Plaza, 150 W. Church St.

Sounds of Lewisville concert

Dirty Little Freaks, the Greatest P!NK Tribute will play the 2017 Sounds of Lewisville Concert Series.

The popular Sounds of Lewisville concert series, a free family favorite since 1991, returns with a series of eight shows this summer in Wayne Ferguson Plaza in the heart of historic Old Town Lewisville. Concerts take place every Tuesday night in June and July. Attendees are encouraged to bring blankets and lawn chairs for their comfort. Outside food and drink are allowed, and food trucks will also be onsite. Well-behaved pets on a leash are allowed at all shows.

For information call 972-219-3401.

June 14

6 to 8 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W Main St.

Home buyers seminar

Thinking about buying a home in Lewisville? This session of the home buyers informational seminar will focus on credit. Email Garrett Forsythe at gforsythe@mfsus.com to RSVP.

6:30 to 8 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W Main St.

Computer training class

The Lewisville Public Library offers free computer training classes. The introductory class on Microsoft Excel is designed for students with limited to no experience using the program. Learn how to create and organize spreadsheets, enter and reorganize data, apply simple formulas and modify the look of spreadsheets. Class is open to teens and adults. Students need to have basic computer knowledge such as how to use a mouse to point, click and drag objects, and how to use a keyboard. Class attendance is on a first-come, first-serve basis. No registration is required. Attendees must bring their Lewisville library card. The class is open to teens and adults.

June 15

8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Hedrick House, 1407 Creekview Drive

Swimming pool operator course

The city of Lewisville is offering a Swimming Pool Operator Course for all public and private pool operators. Courses will be taught by a certified instructor from the National Swimming Pool Foundation.

Pre-registration is required. To register, go to the health services page on cityoflewisville.com, and look for the “Sign Up for Pool Education Course” hyperlink. Pool operators will need to provide their full name, home address, contact phone number, contact email, and preferred class date. Pre-registration must be done by Monday, June 12.

The course fee is $100 per attendee. Cash or check payments will be accepted on the day of the class only. Pre-payment of course fees will not be accepted. A course manual and certificate of completion will be provided to attendees. Manuals will be available in English and Spanish. No test will be given. Certifications are valid for two years from date of issuance.

11:15 a.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Bilingual preschool time

The library is introducing a new line of Spanish programming. The bilingual preschool story time includes reading, writing, singing, talking, playing and more for children ages 3-6 and their families. A free ticket is required for entry, and tickets are handed out 30 minutes before class starts on a first-come first-served basis.

3 to 6 p.m.

Valley Ridge Apartments, 1000 Valley Ridge Boulevard

MARTY

MARTY – the city’s mobile city hall – will be on site for residents. A community liaison along with representatives from the police department will be in attendance.

MARTY stands for Mobilizing Area Resources To Your Neighborhood. The main purposes of MARTY are to increase civic and community engagement, encourage more participation by residents and educate residents on city services.

During each date that MARTY is scheduled to be out in the community varying services will be available along with representatives from city departments to answer questions and assist residents.

For information on MARTY and the next community outreach date visit cityoflewisville.com/residents-info/marty.

4 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Summer fun club

Librarians will host a different activity each week for children entering first through third grades. Activities could include games, crafts or experiments. Tickets are available on a first-come, first-served basis at the Youth Services Desk, 30 minutes prior to the program start time.

6 to 8 p.m.

MCL Grand, 100 N. Charles St.

Garden secrets class

Keep Lewisville Beautiful will hold a class on gardening for wildlife. Discover ways to attract and provide urban habitat for butterflies, song birds, hummingbirds, bees and other animals that bring landscape to life with activity. Call 972-538-5949 reserve a spot. RSVP is required.

For information email info@keeplewisvillebeautiful.org.

7 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Totally teen Thursdays

For teens entering grades six through 12. Each week is a different activity.

June 15 – Teen Advisory Group

June 22 – Make Some Art

June 29 – Teen Trivia

July 6 – Game Night

July 13 – Craft Attack

July 20 – Teen Advisory Group

July 27 – Rock-Paper-Scissors Tournament

Registration is required. Visit the youth services desk or call 972-219-3577 to sign up.

June 16

11:30 a.m.

Senior Activity Center, 1950 S. Valley Parkway

Father’s Day luncheon

The cost is $3 per person. Bring a side dish, salad or dessert to share. Register by Tuesday, June 13.

2 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Friday family matinee

Bring the whole family and enjoy a child-friendly film at the library! No registration required.

June 16 – The Secret Life of Pets

June 23 – The Jungle Book

June 30 – Sing

July 7- Pete’s Dragon

July 14 – Storks

July 21 – The BFG

July 28 – Finding Dory

7 p.m.

MCL Grand, 100 N. Charles St.

Acoustic jam session

The Visual Art League of Lewisville hosts free weekly acoustic jam sessions every Friday. All acoustic instruments and levels are welcome. All music genres are welcome.

For information visit visualartleague.org.

June 17

11:15 a.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Family story time

A story time for all ages to share stories, songs, finger plays and movement reinforcing early literacy skills. Ticket is required. Space is limited, so plan to arrive early. Tickets are available on a first-come, first-serve basis at the youth services desk, 30 minutes before the start of the class.

11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St.

Sustainable living class

Residents will learn what to do to create a more sustainable home and lifestyle with Tim Yatko, Lewisville’s sustainability specialist.

Noon to 3 p.m.

LLELA, 201 E. Jones St.

Saturday at the cabin

Step back in time and visit the historic Minor-Porter log house. Visitors of all ages are welcome to arrive at any time during the open house. Visitors will get a feel for pioneer life as they tour the log home, smoke house, barn, dugout and homestead grounds. The tour is free with the $5 per vehicle entrance fee to LLELA.

3 to 4 p.m.

The Perc Coffeehouse, 115 West Main St.

Robot overlords

The book club is for readers of science fiction, fantasy, horror and graphic novels. Each month has a different theme, and readers will be allowed to select a book that goes along with that theme. Librarians will bring a list of suggested titles to the meetings. Join at any time.

June’s theme is “Gods and Myths.” Attendees will have the opportunity to talk to Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam, whose short story “The Orangery” is a 2016 Nebula Award nominee.

Source Article

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What To Do If You Are Traveling To Lewisville TX

If you are headed to Dallas this year, you should go north into Lewisville. It’s very beautiful city. It is actually a northwest suburb of the city of Dallas, close to Lewisville Lake. This is a unique location where you can see many different things include lakes, alligators, and you can even do a little fishing. If you are going to stay primarily in the city, there are activities that kids can do, as well as adults. It’s actually a very busy community. Let’s go over the many things you can do when you get to Lewisville in the state of Texas.

Places To Visit In Lewisville

One of the first places you should go, if you really want to sample some of the best beer in the area, is the Cobra Brewing Company. Another places the Witherspoon Distillery. If you have kids with you, the Room Escape Games business is a great place to visit, and if the weather is warm, go over to the Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area. These are wonderful places where kids can learn all about the surrounding habitat, and the plants and animals that are in the area. To experience all this, you need to know when to go to the city in order to enjoy the weather while you are there.

When Is The Best Time To Visit Lewisville?

A great time to go is right before summer starts, or as summer is ending. You really want to miss the hot weather. If you go during spring, you can watch the flowers bloom as you are hiking to the area. In the fall, the leaves are starting to turn colors, and it’s a very beautiful site in some areas outside of the city. Plan your trip to Lewisville this year, and you will get to enjoy this beautiful suburb of Dallas.

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United States Court of Appeals, Fifth Circuit.

AURELIO DUARTE; WYNJEAN DUARTE; S. D., A Minor, By and through Wynjean Duarte, acting as her Next Friend; BRANDI DUARTE, Plaintiffs – Appellants v. CITY OF LEWISVILLE, TEXAS, Defendant – Appellee

No. 15-41456

Before DAVIS, ELROD, and HIGGINSON, Circuit Judges.

Aurelio Duarte together with his wife and two children challenge the constitutionality of a Lewisville, Texas, ordinance (“the Ordinance”) that restricts where certain individuals convicted of sex offenses may live within the city. Specifically, they allege that the Ordinance deprives both Duarte individually and the Duarte Family as a whole of procedural due process and violates Duarte’s constitutional right to equal protection. The district court granted summary judgment in favor of Lewisville. We affirm.

I.

In 2006, Duarte was found guilty after a jury trial of Online Solicitation of a Minor, in violation of Texas Penal Code § 15.031, and was sentenced to eight years in prison. The confinement term was suspended and he was placed on community supervision for a term of ten years. In 2007, Duarte’s community supervision was revoked, and he was sentenced to a three-year term of confinement. Duarte’s sentence was fully discharged in June 2010. Upon his release, Duarte returned to Lewisville, Texas, where he had resided with his wife and two daughters prior to his incarceration. As a result of his conviction, Duarte is required by Texas law to register annually with the Texas Department of Public Safety as a child sex offender. Because Duarte must so register, he must also comply with residency restrictions set forth in Lewisville’s “Regulation of Sex Offender Residency” Ordinance, which prohibits registered child sex offenders from residing anywhere in the city limits that is within 1,500 feet of “premises where children commonly gather.”1

The collective area covered by the Ordinance encompasses the majority of Lewisville. According to Appellants, of the 39,967 residential housing units in Lewisville in November 2012, only eight were legally available to them for purchase and two for rent, constituting .025 percent of the total housing stock. From approximately 2010 through 2013, the Duartes resided together in a one-bedroom motel room in Lewisville and searched for a residence that complied with the Ordinance to no avail. Ultimately, the Duartes moved to a nearby town.

The Ordinance sets forth a number of affirmative defenses, which essentially establish exemptions for eligible individuals. Relevant to Duarte’s equal protection claim is an exemption available to certain individuals who are subject to community supervision under Texas law as a result of their sex offense convictions. Under Texas law, individuals sentenced to a term of community supervision following a child sex offense conviction must adhere to a state-imposed condition that they not “go in, on, or within 1,000 feet of a premises where children commonly gather” during the pendency of their community supervision term. Tex. Crim. Proc. Code art. 42.12 § 13B(a)(1)(B). However, a court may waive or modify this restriction if: (1) the defendant is a student at a primary or secondary school; (2) the restrictive zone interferes with the ability of the defendant to attend school or hold a job and consequently constitutes an undue hardship for the defendant; or (3) the restrictive zone is broader than necessary to protect the public, given the nature and circumstances of the offense. § 13B(d), (e). Individuals who have successfully sought a judicial waiver of the state’s geographic restriction are afforded a parallel exemption from Lewisville’s Ordinance. However, child sex offenders—like Duarte—who have been fully discharged or were never subject to state-imposed community supervision, cannot seek a judicial waiver of the state’s geographic condition, because the condition does not actually apply to them. Those individuals are therefore unable to avail themselves of the parallel exemption provided by the Ordinance.

Appellants initially filed this suit on March 26, 2012, seeking compensatory damages, as well as equitable, declaratory, and injunctive relief under the Due Process and Equal Protection Clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment, the Double Jeopardy Clause of the Fifth Amendment, the Ex Post Facto guarantee, and 42 U.S.C. §§ 1983 and 1988. The district court initially dismissed all of Appellants’ claims for lack of standing. This court reversed, holding that both Duarte and his family had shown actual injury sufficient for standing purposes and that their constitutional claims were not rendered moot by their decision to move from Lewisville to a nearby town. See Duarte ex rel. Duarte v. City of Lewisville, 759 F.3d 514, 517–21 (5th Cir. 2014). In June 2015, Lewisville moved for summary judgment on the merits of Appellants’ claims. The Magistrate Judge recommended that the district court grant the motion, and the district court adopted the Magistrate Judge’s Report and Recommendation. See Duarte v. City of Lewisville, 136 F. Supp. 3d 752 (E.D. Tex. 2015). On appeal, Appellants challenge only the district court’s grant of summary judgment with respect to their procedural due process and equal protection claims.

II.

We review a grant of summary judgment de novo, applying the same standards as the district court. Am. Home Assurance Co. v. United Space All., LLC, 378 F.3d 482, 486 (5th Cir. 2004). Summary judgment is only appropriate “if the movant shows that there is no genuine dispute as to any material fact and the movant is entitled to judgment as a matter of law.” Fed. R. Civ. P. 56(a). However, we review for plain error any of the Magistrate Judge’s factual findings and legal conclusions that were accepted by the district court and to which Appellants failed to object. Douglass v. United Servs. Auto Ass’n, 79 F.3d 1415, 1428–29 (5th Cir. 1996) (en banc), superseded by statute on other grounds, 28 U.S.C. § 636(b)(1).

III.

Duarte first asserts that the Ordinance violates his right to due process of law under the Fourteenth Amendment, because it deprives him of a constitutionally-protected liberty interest—namely, the ability to reside in the location of his choice—without adequate procedural protection. Duarte seeks a hearing to prove that he is not currently dangerous and therefore should not be deprived of the liberty to live in the areas prohibited by the Ordinance. The district court rejected Duarte’s procedural due process claim on the ground that the Ordinance did not deprive him of a constitutionally-protected liberty interest. However, we need not reach that question.

As the Supreme Court explained in a similar challenge to a Connecticut sex offender registration law, “even assuming” that the Ordinance deprives Duarte of a liberty interest, “due process does not entitle him to a hearing to establish a fact that is not material under the ․ statute.” Conn. Dep’t of Pub. Safety v. Doe, 538 U.S. 1, 7 (2003); see also Meza v. Livingston, 607 F.3d 392, 401 (5th Cir. 2010) (“When an individual is convicted of a sex offense, no further process is due before imposing sex offender conditions.” (citing Conn. Dep’t of Pub. Safety, 538 U.S. at 7–8)); Doe v. Miller, 405 F.3d 700, 709 (8th Cir. 2009) (concluding that an “Iowa residency restriction [did] not contravene principles of procedural due process under the Constitution” because “[t]he restriction applie[d] to all offenders who [had] been convicted of certain crimes against minors, regardless of what estimates of future dangerousness might be proved in individualized hearings.”). The fact that Duarte seeks to prove—his current dangerousness—is “of no consequence” under the Ordinance. Conn. Dep’t of Pub. Safety, 538 U.S. at 7. The sole relevant question is whether Duarte “is required to register on the Texas Department of Public Safety’s Sex Offender Database ․ because of a conviction involving a minor.” That fact is not in dispute, and Duarte’s underlying conviction is a fact that he “has already had a procedurally safeguarded opportunity to contest.” Id. As noted, Duarte exercised his constitutional right to a trial by jury, was found guilty of the underlying sex offense, and was ultimately sentenced to three years of imprisonment following revocation of his community supervision term. Thus, the absence of an additional hearing allowing Duarte to contest current dangerousness does not offend the principles of procedural due process.2

This conclusion applies with equal force to Appellants’ similar claim that the Ordinance deprives the Duarte Family collectively of a constitutionally-protected liberty interest in “family consortium” without procedural due process. The only procedural defect Appellants identify is the Ordinance’s “complete failure to provide [the Duarte Family] with a pre-deprivation opportunity to be heard on the issue of whether ․ Duarte currently poses (or has ever posed) any threat to anyone by reason of a lack of sexual control.” As is the case with Duarte’s individual claim, procedural due process does not entitle the Duarte Family to a hearing to “establish a fact that is not material” under the Ordinance. Id.

As the Supreme Court observed in Connecticut Department of Public Safety, “[i]t may be that [Appellants’] claim is actually a substantive challenge to [the] statute ‘recast in procedural due process terms.’ ” Id. at 8 (quoting Reno v. Flores, 507 U.S. 292, 308 (1993)). However, because Appellants insist that they intend only to bring a procedural due process claim, we do not reach the substantive due process question.3

IV.

Duarte next alleges that the Ordinance deprives him of his constitutional right to equal protection of law in violation of the Fourteenth Amendment. “The Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment commands that no State shall ‘deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws,’ which is essentially a direction that all persons similarly situated should be treated alike.” City of Cleburne v. Cleburne Living Ctr., 473 U.S. 432, 439 (1985) (quoting Plyler v. Doe, 457 U.S. 202, 216 (1982)). To establish an equal protection claim, Duarte must first show that “two or more classifications of similarly situated persons were treated differently” under the statute. Gallegos-Hernandez v. United States, 688 F.3d 190, 195 (5th Cir. 2012); see also Stefanoff v. Hays Cty., 154 F.3d 523, 525–26 (5th Cir. 1998). Once that threshold element is established, the court then determines the appropriate level of scrutiny to apply. “Strict scrutiny is required if the legislative classification operates to the disadvantage of some suspect class or impinges upon a fundamental right explicitly or implicitly protected by the Constitution.” Richard v. Hinson, 70 F.3d 415, 417 (5th Cir. 1995) (citing San Antonio Indep. Sch. Dist. v. Rodriguez, 411 U.S. 1, 17 (1973)). If neither a suspect class nor a fundamental right is implicated, the classification need only bear a rational relation to a legitimate governmental purpose. Id. at 417.

Notably, Duarte does not challenge the Ordinance’s classification between child sex offenders and the general population. Instead, he brings a more narrow challenge to the differing treatment of child sex offenders subject to state-imposed community supervision versus those who are not. The Magistrate Judge determined that this classification was subject to rational basis review, because it neither disadvantaged a suspect class nor impinged on a fundamental right. Appellants failed to object to this conclusion below, and, although they now make a cursory argument that strict scrutiny should apply, they fail to explain why, much less show that the Magistrate Judge’s conclusion constituted plain error. See Douglass, 79 F.3d at 1428–29.4 Therefore, we limit our analysis to whether the Ordinance’s differing treatment of the two groups identified by Duarte bears a rational relation to a legitimate governmental purpose.

As an initial matter, Lewisville argues that Duarte failed to identify a classification that would allow this court to perform an equal protection analysis at all, reasoning that the Ordinance “does not create multiple classes of child sex offenders,” because the “defense in the Ordinance is equally available to anyone who meets its terms.” We disagree. The Ordinance divides child sex offenders into two categories: (1) those subject to state-imposed community supervision and who are therefore permitted to avail themselves of the exemptions incorporated from state law, and (2) those who are not subject to community supervision and are therefore, by definition, unable to avail themselves of the same exemptions. As a result, the Ordinance provides a form of relief to one category of child sex offenders that is not available to another. This imposition of differing treatment based on delineated categories of sex offenders satisfies the threshold classification requirement. See Sonnier v. Quarterman, 476 F.3d 349, 368–69 (5th Cir. 2007).

We agree, however, that this classification “rationally further[s] a legitimate state interest.” Nordlinger v. Hahn, 505 U.S. 1, 10 (1992). “Rational basis review begins with a strong presumption of constitutional validity.” Malagon de Fuentes v. Gonzales, 462 F.3d 498, 504 (5th Cir. 2006). A court will uphold the classification “if there is a rational relationship between the disparity of treatment and some legitimate governmental purpose.” Heller v. Doe, 509 U.S. 312, 320 (1993). Because “[r]ational basis scrutiny requires only that the legislative classification rationally promote a legitimate governmental objective[,]” Williams v. Lynaugh, 814 F.2d 205, 208 (5th Cir. 1987) (emphasis added), we focus on the specific classification challenged by Duarte. In other words, the “appropriate standard of review is whether the difference in treatment between” child sex offenders on community supervision and child sex offenders not on community supervision “rationally furthers a legitimate state interest.” Nordlinger, 505 U.S. at 11 (examining whether the difference of treatment between newer and older homeowners for property tax purposes furthered a legitimate state interest).

Lewisville’s explanation for the challenged classification is that it “is little more than legislative deference to an existing court order and seeks to avoid potentially conflicting orders.” Duarte complains that this is the first time Lewisville has articulated such a justification. However, “the Equal Protection Clause does not demand for purposes of rational-basis review that a legislature or governing decisionmaker actually articulate at any time the purpose or rationale supporting its classification.” Id. at 15. Instead, the court’s review merely requires “that a purpose may conceivably or ‘may reasonably have been the purpose and policy’ of the relevant governmental decisionmaker.” Id. (quoting Allied Stores of Ohio, Inc. v. Bowers, 358 U.S. 522, 528–529 (1959)). “As long as there is a conceivable rational basis for the official action, it is immaterial that it was not the or a primary factor in reaching a decision or that it was not actually relied upon by the decisionmakers or that some other nonsuspect irrational factors may have been considered.” Reid v. Rolling Fork Pub. Util. Dist., 854 F.2d 751, 754 (5th Cir. 1988). The burden is on the challenging party to counter “any reasonably conceivable state of facts that could provide a rational basis for the classification.” Heller, 509 U.S. at 320 (quoting F.C.C. v. Beach Commc’ns, Inc., 508 U.S. 307, 313 (1993)).

“[C]lassifications serving to protect legitimate expectation and reliance interests do not deny equal protection of the laws.” Nordlinger, 505 U.S. at 13. Indeed, “[t]he protection of reasonable reliance interests is not only a legitimate governmental objective: it provides ‘an exceedingly persuasive justification[.]’ ” Heckler v. Mathews, 465 U.S. 728, 746 (1984) (quoting Kirchberg v. Feenstra, 450 U.S. 455, 461 (1981)). Here, the affirmative defense provided by the Ordinance—and the classification it creates—is rationally related to a legitimate government interest in deferring to an existing state court judgment and protecting the expectation and reliance interests of those who have already sought and received a judicial determination that they are entitled to relief from geographic restrictions.

Further, the fact that some individuals are eligible for an exemption while others are not is not necessarily fatal under rational basis review. “[L]egitimate public policies [may] justify the incidental disadvantages [laws] impose on certain persons.” Romer v. Evans, 517 U.S. 620, 635 (1996). “Like all rational actors with limited resources, [a government actor] must reach its abstract goal ․ by a series of practical requirements and easily-administered rules judged to be reasonable surrogates for it.” Brennan v. Stewart, 834 F.2d 1248, 1259 (5th Cir. 1988). As the Supreme Court has explained, “the fact that ․ exemptions exist ․ does not render [a law] violative of equal protection” if there are “valid reasons for [the] exemptions ․ and no evidence to dispel them.” McGowan v. Maryland, 366 U.S. 420, 427 (1961).

Because the Ordinance’s challenged classification “rationally further[s] a legitimate state interest[,]” Nordlinger, 505 U.S. at 10, we conclude that it does not violate the Equal Protection Clause.

V.

For the foregoing reasons, we AFFIRM the district court’s judgment.

FOOTNOTES

1. The term “premises where children commonly gather” is defined as including “all improved and unimproved areas on the lot where a public park, public playground, private or public school, public or semi-public swimming pool, public or non-profit recreational facility, day care center or video arcade facility is located.”

2. Duarte contends that the Lewisville ordinance is so restrictive that it effectively banishes him from the city, thus infringing on his constitutionally protected liberty interest to reside in the location of his choice. As we have set forth above, in light of the Supreme Court’s holding in Connecticut Department of Public Safety, we need not decide whether the Ordinance deprives Duarte of a constitutionally protected liberty interest, nor do we need to apply the test set forth in Matthews v. Eldridge, 424 U.S. 319 (1976), concerning the constitutional adequacy of procedural protections. However, we note that whether an ordinance or statute like the one at issue here constitutes effective banishment remains an open question.

3. While the procedural element of the Due Process Clause protects individuals “from the mistaken or unjustified deprivation of life, liberty, or property[,]” Carey v. Piphus, 435 U.S. 247, 259 (1978), the substantive element “forbids the government to infringe ․ ‘fundamental’ liberty interests at all, no matter what process is provided, unless the infringement is narrowly tailored to serve a compelling state interest.” Washington v. Glucksberg, 521 U.S. 702, 720–21 (1997) (quoting Reno, 507 U.S. at 302). Because Duarte explicitly waived any arguments about whether effective banishment would infringe substantive due process, both in his briefing and at oral argument, we do not address whether the Ordinance infringes on a fundamental right or liberty interest.

4. Because Appellants have failed to adequately brief the issue, we do not reach the question of whether the Ordinance “operates to the disadvantage of some suspect class or impinges upon a fundamental right explicitly or implicitly protected by the Constitution.” Richard, 70 F.3d at 417. This court previously has held that sex offenders are not a suspect class for equal protection purposes. See Stauffer v. Gearhart, 741 F.3d 574, 587 (5th Cir. 2014). As with Appellants’ Due Process Clause claim, we also do not reach the question of whether the Ordinance impinges on a fundamental right. See supra Note 3.

STEPHEN A. HIGGINSON, Circuit Judge:

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Posted in Life styles

Cant afford expensive life styles Well we have just the idea

Inflation is causing quite a stir around the world these days. Due to the rising prices of routine accessories, people are finding it very hard to lead a comfortable life. Most of the people are striving very hard day and night to meet up with their monthly expenses.

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Posted in Responsibilities

Planning to spend some time alone with your new baby Well here is a plan

The arrival of new baby brings a lot of joy to would-be parents. But the thing that most of the couples don’t realize is that this joy also brings a lot of responsibilities for both of the parents. Raising a baby is not solely a mother’s job but it also shifts thousands of responsibilities on the father. Continue reading “Planning to spend some time alone with your new baby Well here is a plan”